Deer Hunting for Beginners | 5 Tips for Every New Deer Hunter

Deer Hunting for Beginners | 5 Tips for Every New Deer Hunter
March 5, 2022

By: Adam Miller

It has been said that the hardest belt to get in any martial art is the white belt. The reasoning behind this statement is that most people never have the courage to try, so congratulations on starting your path into the world of hunting white-tailed deer. Here are a few things that every new deer hunter should think about no matter if they choose to hunt with grandpa's old deer rifle or want to try their hand at bowhunting.

1. Have Fun

At the end of the day there is no way around it, deer hunting is a challenge.  That’s what keeps hunters coming back.  As soon as we start to measure ourselves against other people's accomplishments it can start to suck the fun out of it, so while you are still learning remember to have fun and take in the moment.  Don’t let other people's achievements get in the way of your hunting journey.  Enjoy the ride.

2. Ask For Help

Professional athletes, wrestlers, and millionaires all have coaches.  No matter your skill level or your place in life there is always something to be learned.  In the world of whitetail hunting it is no different. Some of the best advice on whitetail strategy may lie with the guy you see at the pro shop who set up your bow or sold you your license. Or you may join a forum or post a question on GoWild and ask for some advice.  There are plenty of guys out there that are more than willing to help grow the sport of hunting. Now, guys may not go so far as to drop a pin or bring you out to their honey hole, but they will definitely help you learn your area.

3. Find Little Wins

Let’s face it, even the best hunter will go out and sit and see nothing.  That is all part of the beauty of deer season, we need to take away anything we can from every hunt. Little wins can be not getting lost or getting up and down the tree without dropping anything. Once you have done those things then move on to the next goal, seeing a deer while on stand, next seeing a deer and not getting busted. All of these are small wins that can take an entire deer season to play out but will allow you to not get discouraged.

4. Learn From Your Mistakes

The first time you see a deer in the woods it is not likely to go as planned.  Just like the seasoned hunter who has blank sits, they too have messed up. The difference for the guys who are consistently successful is that they take notes and learn from their mistakes.  They may jump a deer on the walk in and they immediately ask the question, Why? They want to learn why that deer was there?  Where is that deer likely to go? What was the wind direction? As a new hunter it is easy to think that was the only deer and the only chance, and in some cases it is. However, if you were able to ask yourself the same questions as the successful hunter, the next time you find yourself in a similar situation you can have a better idea of where the deer are likely to be.

5. Don’t Take Opportunities For Granted

Oftentimes new hunters see deer that are killed by other, more seasoned hunters and think that they should be held to the same standard. Not the case. The first time you draw back your bow on a mature whitetail buck shouldn't be the first time you have ever drawn on an animal. The amount of nerves, things that can go wrong and racing thoughts take some time to work through. It will be in your best interest to get a few harvests under your belt and enjoy the moment.  When you get the chance at the buck of a lifetime and you have been in the situation before, it will be like second nature pulling that trigger or loosing that arrow.

Embarking on any new journey is going to come with its own set of challenges and chasing the ever elusive white-tailed deer is no different. As you head out into the woods this fall remembering to look at the big picture, where you are at in your journey and where you are headed to make your journey more enjoyable.

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