Tracking the Lone Timber Wolf: Tales of Big Boy and the Eastern Coyotes

Karaca's avatar

Are you sure?

This action cannot be undone.

Close

Report Post

Report User

Block User

scouting & hunting prep0H 45M
13 Comments
31 Upvotes
  • Jon's avatar

    Man that’s a big doggie. I’d be watching my 6.

  • Karaca's avatar

    @Jon the Timbers aren’t bad to have around because they keep the other predators at bay and don’t go after our cattle. Calving season next month is a bit of a concern but they don’t cause many problems. We have enough deer and moose for them to pick off, thankfully.

  • Karaca's avatar

    @Brandon Mitchell two tags a calendar year for wolf/coyote. As a rancher we’re allowed to trap as much as we need to in order to protect the livestock, though. I think non residents have to go through an outfitter/guide but that’s the only restriction.

  • Karaca's avatar

    @Brandon Mitchell ou, we have good bear up here. I’m In timiskaming/que region but anywhere between here, cochrane, timmins, Matheson- it’s worth it. Might have to buy a licence for your dogs but it’s 30$ last I checked.

  • Jon's avatar

    @Karaca Really Karaca? What we hear about them in the western US is that wolves run through pray animals and stock pretty badly. I believe it of course depends on the size of the pack or packs. I don’t know I’m no wolf expert and live in North Carolina. I think the wolves have a place but they have to be managed for a balance. If my livelihood depended on what I was raising I’d probably think a little differently about it. Your point of view is certainly different from the majority. But it might just be geographical for you and your family. Anyway it was nice to hear your perspective. Good luck with the calving this year.

  • Karaca's avatar

    @Jon not geographical, wolves have the least successful predation rates out of all predators. There’s much more contributing factors when it comes to population decline and wolves aren’t high on that list. Even their surplus kills are returned to during breeding/pupping season or eaten by other predators or scavengers. The high rates of predation decline after wolves settle in a new territory- they don’t really know where or how often they can come across

  • Karaca's avatar

    @Jon not geographical; we just gave up trying to eradicate them and focused on observing behaviours and minimizing risks instead. We do manage them through traplines but they have the least successful predation rates out of all wildlife species. They also kill most coyotes they come across which benefits practically everything else lol. And thank you, we’re gonna get -40-50°c by then so those mamas are gonna be miserable 😂

  • Karaca's avatar

    @Karaca by ‘we’ I mean Canada and our ministries.

  • Jon's avatar

    @Karaca holy moly, you all better dress warm. And thanks for the heads up and your opinion and or observation. It’s refreshing.

  • Jon's avatar

    And I guess when every momma is gonna give birth it’s miserable. I’m the father of three, I didn’t feel a thing.🤣🤣🤣

  • Melissa's avatar

    Leave him be

  • Karaca's avatar

    @Melissa respectfully unless you’re on our ranch facing predator risks, you don’t get to decide what measures we take to protect our herd. The snares are set around the winter pasture. If they get caught it’s because they’re too close.

  • Lisa's avatar

    Welcome to the GoWild Fam, Karaca

You must be logged in to comment.

Click here to log in
Karaca's avatar

Karaca C

Ontario, Canada

3rd gen Rancher, 4th gen trapper, and hunter Northern livin’ Métis

Scannable QR code

Use your phone’s camera

Scan the QR code above to join GoWild for free.

Find gear & earn Rewards now.

Share uncensored. Download GoWild.

Scannable QR code

A free social app for outdoorsmen. Share uncensored. Find gear. Earn Rewards.

Scan the QR code with your phone's camera now.

A free social app for outdoorsmen. Share uncensored. Find gear. Earn Rewards.

We use cookies to offer you a better browsing experience. By continuing to use our site, you accept our use of cookies, Privacy Policy, and Terms of Use.